sharp vs. jimp - Node libraries to make thumbnail images

15 December 2020   0 comments   Node, JavaScript

I recently wrote a Google Firebase Cloud function that resizes images on-the-fly and after having published that I discovered that sharp is "better" than jimp. And by better I mean better performance.

To reach this conclusion I wrote a simple trick that loops over a bunch of .png and .jpg files I had lying around and compare how long it took each implementation to do that. Here are the results:

Using jimp

▶ node index.js ~/Downloads
Sum size before: 41.1 MB (27 files)
...
Took: 28.278s
Sum size after: 337 KB

Using sharp

▶ node index.js ~/Downloads
Sum size before: 41.1 MB (27 files)
...
Took: 1.277s
Sum size after: 200 KB

The files are in the region of 100-500KB, a couple that are 1-3MB, and 1 that is 18MB.

So basically: 28 seconds for jimp and 1.3 seconds for sharp

Bonus, the code

Don't ridicule me for my benchmarking code. These are quick hacks. Let's focus on the point.

sharp

function f1(sourcePath, destination) {
  return readFile(sourcePath).then((buffer) => {
    console.log(sourcePath, "is", humanFileSize(buffer.length));
    return sharp(sourcePath)
      .rotate()
      .resize(100)
      .toBuffer()
      .then((data) => {
        const destPath = path.join(destination, path.basename(sourcePath));
        return writeFile(destPath, data).then(() => {
          return stat(destPath).then((s) => s.size);
        });
      });
  });
}

jimp

function f2(sourcePath, destination) {
  return readFile(sourcePath).then((buffer) => {
    console.log(sourcePath, "is", humanFileSize(buffer.length));
    return Jimp.read(sourcePath).then((img) => {
      const destPath = path.join(destination, path.basename(sourcePath));
      img.resize(100, Jimp.AUTO);
      return img.writeAsync(destPath).then(() => {
        return stat(destPath).then((s) => s.size);
      });
    });
  });
}

I test them like this:

console.time("Took");
const res = await Promise.all(files.map((file) => f1(file, destination)));
console.timeEnd("Took");

And just to be absolutely sure, I run them separately so the whole process is dedicated to one implementation.

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